When finding and hiring contractors to perform construction work, property owners rely on information provided by the contractor, especially relating to the experience, skill and specialized knowledge they possess to perform the requested job. But, what happens when the contractor does not have the adequate experience and knowledge to perform the work properly? According to the New Jersey Supreme Court Appellate Division, such a contractor may be liable to the owner for consumer fraud, which provides for triple damages as well as recovery of attorneys’ fees and costs of suit.

Wanting an outdoor tennis court, the Hudson Harbour Condominium Association hired Oval Tennis, Inc. to install an open-celled Premier Court (specific brand of tennis court) on an existing concrete slab. Oval, an “experienced” tennis court installer, represented to the Association that it was a certified Premier Court installer, was familiar with the requirements of the job, possessed sufficient experience to properly install the court and employed trained technicians to perform the work. Despite the contract calling for an open-cell court and Oval’s representations, Oval installed a closed-cell, non-breathable court, which was unsuitable for the concrete surface it was installed upon.

Immediately after installation, the Association started noticing problems with the new court, which included blisters near the net, holes, ripples, bubbling and delaminating of the court surface. These conditions were a direct result of Oval’s failure to install the court with the contracted open-cell surface material, which would allow vapor to push through the breathable court surface. Instead, the closed-cell surface did not allow vapor to pass through, ultimately resulting in a buildup of vapor and moisture trapped underneath the court which caused the problems on the surface.


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