The November 16, 2016 issue of the Wall Street Journal ran an article about Celebration, Florida, which is the master-planned community built by The Walt Disney Company in 1996. The title of the article summarized the state of affairs in Celebration as follows: “There Is Little Celebration in the Town Disney Built: Mold, leaks, rot are hurting the 1990s utopia; ‘they’re harassing my team.’” My initial thought was that if this can happen to a community built by the world’s most famous mouse, it is little wonder that a large portion of my practice involves representing community associations in lawsuits against developers and architects for construction and design deficiencies.

Continue Reading

Community associations are often given common elements in transition that incur damage from design and/or construction deficiencies. Associations typically have limited funds. Even those with ample financial resources are usually governed by Boards whose members are keenly aware of the fact that the Association’s funds are trust monies that need to be carefully managed and

Buying a home is one of the most rewarding, yet potentially costly, life experiences. Construction takes months, sometimes years, and despite the existence of building codes and municipal oversight, mistakes happen. Due to the concealed nature of construction (e.g. important construction elements get closed up by siding, cladding, and drywall), mistakes are hidden and unidentified

On March 11, 2008, in the matter of Camelot Condominium Association, Inc v. Dryvit Systems, Inc., pending before the Superior Court of New jersey, Docket No. BER-L-012457-04, a jury entered a verdict in favor of the Plaintiff and against Dryvit Systems, Inc (“Dryvit”) for violations of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act. Dryvit Systems

After a bench trial, a judge in New Haven, Connecticut ruled that the seller of a house that had obvious, visible mold damage – black mold stains in the utility room and water stained and rotted wood inside – had intentionally concealed the existence of this problem, and was liable to the buyers for the cost to prevent further water intrusion, the cost to repair the damage caused by past water intrusion, and $25,000 for emotional distress.
Continue Reading

Your home inspector probably advised you that it’s good sense to prevent possible water damage by turning off the water to your second home when you’re not in residence. But if you neglect to do so and your defective toilet floods the condominium unit downstairs, New Jersey courts may not hold you liable for the damage to your neighbor’s home.
Continue Reading