It’s that moment that no homeowner wants to have. You just returned from vacation and was in the midst of stowing the suitcases under the house in your crawlspace. As you were exiting the crawlspace something caught your eye—a wet spot on the concrete slab floor. It wasn’t a puddle, but it was clearly moisture.

Hoping for something minor, you began to poke around. During your search you discovered that a portion of insulation in between the floor boards was soaked. When you removed that you found the problem, or at least, the manifestation of the problem. A water leak was dripping down a vertical pipe in between my walls.

Unfortunately, every homeowner will have to deal with a situation like this at one time or another. Fortunately, we have insurance for these very situations, though, knowing what to do and how to handle this situation will make a world of difference to both your mental health and to your wallet.


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Having construction work or renovations done on your home is certainly an exciting, but undoubtedly stressful time. In fact, the process from selecting a suitable (and experienced) contractor to completion of the project can be downright daunting at times. As a homeowner myself, who coincidentally is going through this very process as we speak, I know the difficulties of sifting through countless potential contractors, negotiating prices, and coordinating schedules and the like. As daunting as it may seem, there are certain steps a homeowner can take at the outset that will mitigate potential pitfalls during construction, ensure your project is constructed properly, mitigate construction disputes, and alleviate unnecessary stress.

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Stark & Stark Shareholders Thomas J. Pryor and Donald B. Brenner have successfully settled the Bay View Condominium construction defect case for $3.1M. Shareholder Randy Sawyer, along with Associates Gene Markin, John Prisco, and Tara Speer were all part of the team effort that achieved this settlement.

The case involved design and construction defect claims which caused damage to common elements from water infiltration through and around brick and other exterior cladding systems, plus roofs, windows and a plaza over a parking garage. Stark & Stark is particularly proud of this result because the case involved challenging insurance coverage issues related to the lack of proof of consequential damage to sheathing and framing.


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Generally speaking, a contractor’s commercial general liability (“CGL”) policy is designed to cover personal injury or property damage caused by an accident resulting from the contractor’s work. The policy is not meant to be a guarantee of the contractor’s work and therefore does not cover damages to the work itself – instead, these are known as “business risk” damages. The concept that is inherent in every agreement for the performance of construction work is the risk that the work will be done improperly.

By selecting a particular contractor, the owner has to make a business judgment as to the qualifications and reliability of the selected contractor, and therefore assumes the risk that the work will be done incorrectly. If the work is done improperly and needs to be corrected, the contractor, and ultimately the owner, bears the burden of repairing or fixing that faulty work. The contractor’s insurance is not a performance bond guaranteeing the work; instead, the commercial general liability insurance is designed to cover any unexpected damages that arise from the contractor’s work, such as damage to other property caused by the faulty work.

Consider a roofer hired to install a new roof on a building. Once completed, the roof is the roofing contractor’s “work.” If the roofer installs the wrong type of shingles, but does everything else correctly, the only “damage” to speak of would be to the roof shingles themselves, i.e. the roofer’s work. The cost of replacing the shingles is therefore that “business risk” not covered by insurance.


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A New Jersey trial court granted summary judgment in favor of Selective Insurance Company holding that the “continuous trigger” theory does not provide insurance coverage subsequent to the manifestation of damages that arose from a subcontractor’s negligence in the construction of a condominium development. The issue arose in the matter of Cypress Point Condominium Association v. Selective Way Insurance Company, et al., Docket No. HUD-L-936-14, 2015 N.J. Super. Unpub. LEXIS 721 (N.J. Super., Hudson Cnty. Mar. 30, 2015) (“Cypress Point”).

“The ‘continuous trigger’ theory holds that an occurrence occurs under an insurance policy each time damage accrues over a continuous period of time, from ‘exposure to manifestation’.” Cypress Point, at *12. Courts developed the “continuous trigger” theory to counter scientific uncertainties surrounding initial manifestations of damages typically at issue in environmental, toxic tort, and delay manifestation property damage claims. Id.

In Cypress Point, the Cypress Point Condominium Association (the “Association”) filed a Declaratory Judgment Action against Selective Way Insurance Company (“Selective”) seeking a declaratory judgment that Selective owed a duty to indemnify its insured, MDNA Framing, in connection with an underlying construction defect action filed by the Association. The Association filed an amended complaint in the underlying action on June 12, 2012, bringing claims against MDNA Framing, which was contracted to perform framing and window installation work in connection with the construction of the Cypress Point condominium development. Construction of the development commenced in 2002 and was substantially completed in 2004. Subsequent to the completion of construction, unit owners began to experience water infiltration around the interior windows. The Association’s liability expert found numerous defects related to MDNA Framing’s work, including missing flashings, a lack of a continuous water management system, and improper sealant application around the windows. The Association’s liability expert issued his initial report opining on these deficiencies on June 30, 2012.


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A unanimous New Jersey Supreme Court opinion has affirmed the rights of an aggrieved plaintiff to recover counsel fees incurred in prosecuting relief through a declaratory judgment; enforcing a duty to defend owed by a general liability carrier to a contractor defendant in a construction defect action.

In Occihifinto v. Olivo Constructionn, Inc., et als

In a recent decision in Kane Builders, Inc. v. Continental Casualty Company, the United States District Court in New Jersey remanded back to state court the determination of whether Continental owed the builder defense and indemnity in connection with an underlying construction defect case which had been playing out in state court.

As is typical

It is no secret that insurance policies are famous for containing convoluted language. The average insured likely has no clue what is and is not covered. Little solace can be found in referring to the conspicuous “Definitions” section; ultimately no more than a trap to trick unsuspecting policyholders into believing that any ambiguities that arise will be easily rectified. Insurance is big business and carriers don’t want to have to pay claims. At the end of the day, coverage is all about semantics and carriers use the complicated wording of their policies to create plausible ways to deny claims otherwise assumed to be covered. Carriers bank on the fact that many insureds either don’t know the law (and will simply accept the carrier’s interpretations) or can’t afford to fight the carrier in court. Carriers save significant dollars each year because some insureds don’t pursue questionable coverage denials. Radical change is not likely on the horizon. Some good news, however, is that there is a body of policyholder-friendly case laws in New Jersey on the issue of ambiguity.

A recent unpublished decision out of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey reaffirmed the long-standing principal that ambiguities in insurance policies must be construed in favor of the insured. In Gregory Packaging, Inc., v. Travelers Prop. Cas. Co. of Am., the Court found that a shutdown of the insured’s factory caused by the discharge of an unsafe amount of ammonia constituted a “direct physical loss or damage” to the property; a condition precedent to coverage. The carrier argued that a physical change of, or alteration to, the property, is necessary to trigger coverage. The Court disagreed and found that an accident that renders a building unfit for occupancy, and in need of remediation, amounts to a direct physical loss. Here, the release of ammonia physically transformed the air, rendering the facility dangerous. Accordingly, the Court determined that coverage cannot be denied on the basis that there was not a “direct physical loss.”


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The “business risk” doctrine has become a fixture of insurance coverage law, with profound implications for insured contractors and plaintiff property owners involved in construction-defect litigation. Concisely stated, the doctrine holds that “faulty workmanship standing alone, resulting in damage only to the work product itself. . .” falls outside the ambit of coverage provided by a CGL policy.
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