Community Associations

Earlier this year, the New Jersey Appellate Division reversed a Bergen County trial court decision, which had dismissed a construction defect case filed by a condominium association more than six years after the condominium complex was substantially completed, but less than six years after the association received the transition engineering report identifying construction defects. Finding

Read the first part of this article here.

You’re in your car heading home when you turn into your condominium development. That road you just entered, it’s a common element. On your route to your unit you pass by the club house and community pool— these are common elements as well. You’re finally home as you pull into your driveway—which, by the way, probably isn’t a common element, but rather most likely a limited common element. You enter your unit. In the case of a condominium, does your unit qualify as a common element, limited common element, or strictly unit owner property? The answer, in fact, is that the unit you just entered is likely a combination of all three. This article will take a closer look at this distinction.

A typical condominium development is comprised of numerous structures that usually include the building or buildings that house individual condominium units, more often than not a club house as well as other lands and improvements such as community pools, fitness centers, playgrounds, etc. These buildings, lands and improvements can be classified as common elements, limited common elements, or unit property. When you purchase a unit in a condominium development, you are in fact not only purchasing ownership rights to a particular unit, but are also acquiring an interest in the common elements and limited common elements. So, what are these common and limited common elements and how do they differ from unit property?


Continue Reading The Need-to-Knows of Living in a Condominium Development – Part Two: Common and Limited Common Elements versus Unit property in Condominiums

Generally speaking, a contractor’s commercial general liability (“CGL”) policy is designed to cover personal injury or property damage caused by an accident resulting from the contractor’s work. The policy is not meant to be a guarantee of the contractor’s work and therefore does not cover damages to the work itself – instead, these are known as “business risk” damages. The concept that is inherent in every agreement for the performance of construction work is the risk that the work will be done improperly.

By selecting a particular contractor, the owner has to make a business judgment as to the qualifications and reliability of the selected contractor, and therefore assumes the risk that the work will be done incorrectly. If the work is done improperly and needs to be corrected, the contractor, and ultimately the owner, bears the burden of repairing or fixing that faulty work. The contractor’s insurance is not a performance bond guaranteeing the work; instead, the commercial general liability insurance is designed to cover any unexpected damages that arise from the contractor’s work, such as damage to other property caused by the faulty work.

Consider a roofer hired to install a new roof on a building. Once completed, the roof is the roofing contractor’s “work.” If the roofer installs the wrong type of shingles, but does everything else correctly, the only “damage” to speak of would be to the roof shingles themselves, i.e. the roofer’s work. The cost of replacing the shingles is therefore that “business risk” not covered by insurance.


Continue Reading Insurers of General Contractors Can No Longer Hide Behind Business Risk in Refusing to Defend Their Insureds in Construction Defect Litigation

Pursuant to the Planned Real Estate Development Full Disclosure Act (“PREDFDA”), N.J.S.A. §45:22A-21 et seq., a developer of a proposed condominium development that is subject to the registration requirements of PREDFDA must establish an association responsible for the management of the common elements and facilities of the proposed condominium development. N.J.S.A. §45:22A-43. The developer is required to organize the association prior to the filing of the master deed or declaration of covenants and restrictions. The association may be established as a for-profit or nonprofit corporation, unincorporated association, or any other form permitted by law.

No matter the nature of the association, its responsibility is the same – “the administration and management of the condominium and condominium property, including but not limited to the conduct of all activities of common interest to the unit owners.” New Jersey Condominium Act (the “Condo Act”), N.J.S.A. §46:8B-12. The powers of the association are vested in an executive board that is tasked with carrying out the responsibilities of the association. Upon the formation of the association, the developer will appoint representatives to sit on the executive board and carry out the duties of the association. However, as the developer begins to sell units in the condominium development, pursuant to PREDFDA and the Condo Act, the developer is required to surrender control of the executive board to unit owners elected by the members of the association. This process is known as “transition.”

PREDFDA and the Condo Act require that no later than 60 days after the sale of 25% of the “lots, parcels, units or interests, not fewer than 25 percent of the members of the executive board shall be elected by the owners.” N.J.S.A. §45:22A-47; see also N.J.S.A. §46:8B-12.1. Once the developer sells 50% of the units, etc., within 60 days thereafter 40% of the membership of the executive board is to be comprised of unit owners elected by the owners. Final transition, and complete surrender of the executive board by the developer to the unit owners, occurs once the developer has sold 75% of the units in the development.


Continue Reading The Passing of the Torch – Transition of Control of a Condominium Association from the Developer to Unit Owners

No matter whether you are a first time home buyer or veteran repeat purchaser chances are you have been mentally preparing for the deluge of paper that accompanies this major purchase. The sheer magnitude of documents is understandably overwhelming. Document after document is slid across the shiny, polished conference table in your attorney’s office. At a certain point you become automated; sign here, initial there—a few hours later and you may have just signed your first born child away. Yet, when purchasing a condominium or townhouse keep your wits about you and break out your reading glasses because there is one document you want to read—the Public Offering Statement.

A developer of a community development is required under New Jersey’s Planned Real Estate Development Full Disclosure Act to register the planned development with the Division of Housing and Development in the State Department of Community Affairs. In connection with its registration, the developer must also submit a proposed Public Offering Statement. Once approved, the Public Offering Statement must be freely available to all prospective purchasers prior to the closing of the unit.


Continue Reading The Need-to-Knows of Living in a Condominium Development – Part One: The Public Offering Statement

In a decision that has renewed the faith of condominium law practitioners in our state’s judicial system, the New Jersey Appellate Division recently issued a strongly worded opinion in Port Liberte II Condo. Ass’n v. New Liberty Residential Urban Renewal Co. et. al., 2014 N.J. Super. LEXIS 19 (App. Div. Jan. 21, 2014) (approved for publication on January 31, 2014), that has prevented a grave injustice and allowed unit owners to control their own fates by having the power to validate unauthorized decisions of the board.
Continue Reading Fate and Fortune: Unauthorized Acts of the Board Cannot Be Challenged by Non-Owner Third Parties but Can Be Retroactively Cured by the Membership

Every day condominium associations battle delinquencies and employ creative strategies for collecting unpaid assessments. Sometimes ambitious collection efforts are successful – sometimes not. One aggressive strategy employed by associations is the appointment of a rent receivership for a vacated or abandoned unit owned by a delinquent owner. If successful, a receivership would entitle the association to collect rent for a unit it technically does not own and apply the monies received towards the owed arrearage. While the concept sounds good in theory, it is actually quite difficult to accomplish in practice given the likely upside down mortgage on the property, the inevitable foreclosure proceedings by the bank, and the fact that abandoned units are not occupied by paying tenants.
Continue Reading Creative Collection Solutions: The Rewards and Challenges of Rent Receivership

The short answer is – Yes! The Condominium Act specifically obligates all unit owners to pay a proportionate share of the common expenses. Even where a unit owner waives the right to use a common element or abandons the unit there is no exemption from liability for common expenses. The Condominium Act, N.J.S.A. 46:8B-1 to -38, provides in pertinent part:
Continue Reading Are Condominium Unit Owners Unconditionally Obligated to Pay Common Expense Assessments?

The novel nature of condominium ownership, specifically the transition process, affects the statute of limitations analysis. The Planned Real Estate Development Full Disclosure Act requires that the developer of a condominium staff the board of trustees of an association and control the affairs of the association until seventy-five percent of the units in the development are sold.
Continue Reading How Transition Affects the Statute of Limitations Analysis